Browsing category: Food and Wine in Umbria, Life in Umbria, Rebecca's Ruminations

Hey, What’s Up With the Bread in Umbria?

The Umbrians have lied to me.

They have been telling me all this time that their traditional bread is an acquired taste.  That, my friends, in a gross falsehood.  I have been here close to 20 years, and it is still one of the biggest disappointments of my overseas move to Italy, second perhaps only to the discovery that one does not transform into a sultry mediterranean seductress simply through a process of cellular osmosis by living in a country inhabited by sultry mediterranean seductresses.  Apparently, you are either born Sophia Loren or you are not.

Traditionally, Umbrian bread (also known as pane comune) is made with three ingredients:  flour, yeast, and water.  And, not surprisingly, once baked it tasted like flour, mixed with a little yeast and water.  To someone who has grown up with the neighborhood Italian bakery hawking freshly baked “Italian bread”– that wonderfully aromatic thick baguette-type loaf with a moist, chewy, flavorful crumb and a crisp, flaky, glazed crust—this saltless low loaf with its dense, dry crumb and hard, tough crust is blasphemy.

Artisan baker wood fired oven baked bread has a moister crumb and a slightly sourdough flavor: edible.

Why do Umbrians still remain faithful to their traditional bread, especially now that fabulous Tuscan bread (closer to what the world associates with “Italian bread”) and Neapolitan bread (with a slightly chewier crumb and dark crust) is easily found?  One explanation is historical:  in the mid-1500s,  Pope Paul III imposed a hefty tax on salt to increase revenue from his Papal States (which included present-day Umbria).  Rather than pay up, the inhabitants simply began making their bread without salt, and the tradition still continues.  That said, Umbrians routinely used leeches to bleed their ailing brethren, but over the centuries came to the conclusion that perhaps that wasn’t the best idea.  So history and tradition can’t be the sole reason.

Bread baked by a bakery in a conventional oven: given a choice between this and death, edible.

What it really comes down to is this:  bland Umbrian bread is the perfect foil for traditional Umbrian cooking.  In fact, when eaten how nature—and centuries of culinary tradition– intended, this otherwise sad excuse for a loaf becomes, well, delicious.  Before I tell you the secret of its transformation, let me be clear that there is Umbrian bread and then there is Umbrian bread.  Traditional Umbrian bread made by an artisan baker in a wood fired oven is, given certain preconditions, edible.  Traditional Umbrian bread made by a bakery in a regular oven is, given the choice between that and death, edible.  Traditional Umbrian bread of the variety made by big commercial bakeries and sold at the supermarket shrinkwrapped in plastic is inedible.  Period.

Choose death.

La Scarpetta

La scarpetta is, simply put, when you use a piece of bread to wipe the remaining sauce off your plate and pop it in your mouth.  It is one of those behaviors that is both considered impolite yet universally tolerated, as everyone recognizes it as one of the pure joys of human existence.  Sort of like putting your feet up on the coffee table after Thanksgiving dinner.  Umbrian bread is perfect for la scarpetta.  As it has virtually no flavor of its own, the bread lets the strong flavors of traditional Umbrian sauces, many made with game, shine through.  Rather than a foodstuff, consider it a mode of sauce transportion.  An edible fork, if you will.

Il Panino

Umbrian cured meats—primarily prosciutto, but also salame, capocollo, salsiccie secche, guanciale, and coppa—are intensely flavorful and aromatic, and also tend to be heavily salted.  The traditional recipe of 1-1-1 (one finger width bread slice to one finger width coldcuts to one finger width bread slice) would be overwhelming if a more savory type of bread were used.  Again, with a good quality wood-oven baked loaf, a simple bread and Norcia prosciutto sandwich with a swig of farmer’s red to wash it down is one of life’s gastronomic epiphanies.

La Bruschetta

Okay, it’s broo-SKET-ta, folks.  I don’t want to hear any of that broo-SCHE -ta going on.  If I needed only one single reason to defend the continued existence of  Umbrian bread, this would be it.  With its dense crumb, Umbrian bread takes well to being sliced and toasted over wood coals (the best way to make bruschetta) without breaking apart and soaks up just the right amount of olive oil to strike the delicate balance between dry and dripping-down-your-forearm.    The bread’s lack of flavor means you don’t miss one hint of fruity or grassy or spicy or fresh or mellowed extra-virgin olive oil, and you can pick things up with more or less salt sprinkled on top and, though the purist jury is out, a clove of garlic rubbed over the top.  The role that traditional Umbrian bread plays in constructing the perfect slice of bruschetta is enough to redeem it, in my book.

It grows on you.

Hmm…now that I think about it, I have acquired a bit of a taste for this region’s bread.  Okay, okay.  I guess the Umbrians haven’t lied after all.


Miracle Water: L’Acqua di San Giovanni

The same sorry scene repeats itself 364 days a year at my house.  My children do not want to bathe.  They beg, they plead, they cry, they bargain.  They act as if they are being denied a basic human right to choose filth.  (For any scientists out there still searching for the missing link between the animal kingdom and homo erectus, I’m here to tell you that it is little boys.  Roughly between the ages of 3 and 30.)  But one day a year, that magical 365th day, they literally can’t wait to hop in the tub– the feast day of John the Baptist.  For this reason alone I would have voted for his canonization.

The feast day of John the Baptist—La Festa di San Giovanni Battista—falls on June 24th, and on the eve of this holy day we spend an hour walking the fields and meadows around our house along with our Umbrian neighbors gathering petals of wildflowers, snippets of herbs, and scented leaves (tradition holds that there should be one hundred varieties gathered, but we start to fudge our numbers about an hour into the project) which we then soak in water in a small tub overnight to prepare the traditional acqua di San Giovanni.   Our assortment includes flowers in season (broom, rose, lavender, chamomile), herbs from our garden (rosemary, mint, thyme, sage), and aromatic plants along the country roads (bay, walnut, wild fennel).

Our flower and herb mix soaking in water

The important ingredient–and the one which often seems to be the most wily, almost always involving wading through thorny brambles in shorts to get at it–is, of course, l’erba di San Giovanni or St. John’s Wort.

The elusive St. John's wort

The soaking flowers and herbs are left outside during the entire night preceding the feast day for two important reasons.  First, tradition holds that during the night the Madonna and Saint John pass to leave their benediction on the profumed water, the power of which can stay curses, envy, and harmful charms—especially those directed towards children—and ward off demons and witches.  And, second, it is imperitive that the infusion be moistened by the first dew the next morning.  The guazza, or dew, which settles during the night of Saint John has long been thought to have mystical powers.  Surely tied to ancient pagan beliefs surrounding the summer solstice and the increased potency of the four elements (earth, wind, fire and water) during that night, even today you hear the aforism: La guazza di Santo Gioanno fa guarì da ogni malanno or “St. John’s dew cures all ills”.

There are numerous traditions tied to the supposed powers of St. John’s dew, which represents the tears of Salome crying over the death of John the Baptist.  In various parts of Italy cloths were once laid out overnight to soak up the dew, which was then wrung out and used for its curative powers.  It is also said that there is no better night to make a wish than the night of St. John…you simply have to sleep outdoors with an object which symbolizes your heart’s desire.  The object will be moistened by the dew come morning, and your wish is sure to come true.

Smiling faces ready for their bath. A miracle!

And so, the morning of the 24th, we all gather around our small basin of profumed acqua di San Giovanni.  I go first, rinsing my face and hands (sure, I may not be a believer, but the powers of the water are supposed to be especially beneficial to the skin and anything that can stave off wrinkles is worth a go, in my book).  Then the rest is poured into the tub and mixed with warm water from the tap and my sons hop in, happily splashing each other, tossing petals on the floor, and generally making a big mess.

Fun in the tub with l'acqua di San Giovanni

But they come out smelling of flowers and herbs, tradition and belief, blessings and health.  And the fact that there was no kicking and screaming about washing is proof enough that l’acqua di San Giovanni works miracles!


Losing religion, finding god

There are a few fundamental truths which, once you become a parent, crystallize and form the primary touchstones of your existence.  For example, sacks of oranges and cattle prods are all fine and dandy, but if you want real torture try walking barefoot across a cotto floor strewn with Legos.  And, given a choice between twenty minutes of sex or twenty minutes of dead sleep, sleep wins hands down.  Finally, you believe in God.  Or, you don’t.  Either way, it’s time to decide because preschoolers don’t deal well with ethical grey areas.

About six months ago, I drove past a huge basilica in the valley below Assisi, and my five year old piped up from the back seat, “Mamma, what’s that?”  Now, it is probably not such a good thing that my son doesn’t recognize a church in Assisi, which is probably one of the places in which there is the greatest church per capita density on the planet.  “It’s a church,” I told him.

“What do you do there?” he asked.

“Well, you pray.”

“You play?”

“No, pray.”

“What’s praying?”

“Uh, well, that’s when you talk to God”

“What’s God?”

And there it was.  The $64,000 question.  One of the few questions to which I have no answer that I can’t simply respond, “I’m not sure, but I bet Babbo knows.”  Because, quite frankly, my husband isn’t that sure either.

I grew up in a deeply religious family, though of the flower children, guitar plucking, socially liberal kind.  Though I don’t consider myself psychologically scarred by all that, by the time I left home for college I was, let’s say, religion-ed out.  So, after a brief stint over at the Unitarians to detox, I settled into a benign sort of agnosticism. Though I considered myself a practician of the basic judeo-christian ethic which forms the foundation of most western religions, I would only actually show up at Mass once or twice a year to please Grandma.

When I moved to Italy after college, I thought my ambivalence regarding actively practicing a religion would be a problem, but I quickly found that, instead, there are quite a few Italians who are casual Catholics here in Umbria.  And that no one really cared about whether or not I went to Mass, uh, religiously.

Italy, and especially a rural area like Umbria, is undoubtably Catholic.  Italian civic culture is steeped in Catholicism, and in many ways there is no way of seeing where the religious culture ends and the secular begins.  Most holidays in Italy are Catholic feast days, the local parish is very much the fulcrum of social participation in the countryside, and the passage from childhood to adulthood is still generally measured in sacraments:  Christening, first holy Communion, Confirmation, nuptial Mass, and funeral Mass.  Almost all public spaces sport crosses on the walls, even in some businesses where it seems out of place at best, like the local bank.

It is refreshing, in comparison to how in your face religious practice has become in the States, to live in a place where it is not an issue at all.  Part of that is, of course, because something like 98% of the population of Umbria is Catholic, so no one really feels the need to wear their religion on their sleeve.  But even among my few friends here who are active church goers and fervent believers, I have never felt uncomfortable, or judged, or pressured by their belief.  Italians, and, more specifically, Umbrians, tend to be quite pragmatic about their religiosity.  They are often Catholic and communist, both divorce and abortion have been legalized through popular referendum, and they are reluctant proselytizers.

In the years since I’ve moved, I have steadily and quietly shed any dogma which may have lingered in my moral paradigm but also feel like my life here has given me the opportunity to tap into a different spirituality…based on the tennets of secular humanism, no doubt, but still giving my life reference points which have led me to find my own sense of god, even if it’s not God.  Contact with and respect for the natural world.  A feeling of belonging to a comunity.  The importance of family and friends, and prioritizing the time you spend cultivating those relationships.  Recognizing the wonderous beauty in art and architecture.  The joy of eating good food in the context of its history and culture.  The value of slowing down and finding time for quietness.

The late David Foster Wallace said this:

“There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys.  How’s the water?” and the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, “What the hell is water?” ….

The capital-T Truth is about life BEFORE death.  It is about the real value of a real education, which has almost nothing to do with knowledge, and everything to do with simple awareness; awareness of what is so real and essential, so hidden in plain sight all around us, all the time, that we have to keep reminding ourselves over and over: ‘This is water. This is water.’ It is unimaginably hard to do this, to stay conscious and alive in the adult world day in and day out.”

And this is what I have found here in Umbria.  Perhaps not the God of churches and rites, but instead moments of grace and awareness where all of a sudden I am yanked out of my automatic pilot working and parenting and surviving mode and become aware of an instant in time, a fleeting quotidian miracle, and am reminded “This is water.”  And there I see god.

The view from my house. This is water.


Spring fever: May arrives in Umbria

About 15 years ago, just a few months after moving from Chicago to a tiny hamlet in the Umbrian countryside outside of Assisi, I was lying in bed at about 2 am in that state of semi-consciousness between sleep and lucidity, when I heard what was unmistakeably the sound of footsteps, and lots of them, on our gravel drive. I immediately found myself wide awake and focused on the sound, growing louder and closer, as it was punctuated by the muffled crash of a flowerpot being stumbled over, a whispered oath, and some quiet laughter. I heard another stumble and a quick, low, discordant wail.

I elbowed my Italian husband. Hard. “Honey,” I hissed, “There are burglars outside!” He was instantly awake and jumped out of bed, throwing his pants on fireman-style. “How do you know?” he hissed back. “Because I can hear them walking on the drive. They keep tripping over flowerpots. And I think they’re carrying a dying cat with them.”

At which point he froze, with one pant-leg on and one off, in a hunched over flamingo position, and considered me. Because I have been known to make use of–ahem–comic embellishment in the past. And suddenly I could see his eyes clear with a dawning realization, as he slowly straightened up and said, “Oh, it’s the first of May tomorrow.”

“What, you get burglarized on a schedule?!?” I replied, incredulous.

Of course we weren’t about to be robbed, but instead serenaded by a group of locals who were carrying out the ancient tradition of Cantamaggio, or “singing in” the first of May, which symbolically marks the end of the long winter and beginning of spring with song and drink. And more drink. And then, a little drink.

The maggiaioli under a full moon

With origins which can be traced back to cultures predating the Roman empire in an area covering what is now the central Italian regions, during the final night of April groups of folk singers with accordians, guitars, wooden recorders, and various simple percussion instruments, including tambourines and triangles, wind their way through the streets of town and from one farmhouse to the next in the countryside singing traditional folk songs.

A maggiaiolo with his organetto

The simple yet cheerful rythmic songs are sung—generally alternating between a solo voice and a chorus–in Italian, though usually in a strong, at times almost impenetrable, dialect. The lyrics ostensibly touch on themes of nature and the seasons, primarily spring, but are laced with double entendres and baudy wordplay…in fact, after the serenade is finished the singers, with much raucous laughter, invite their wakened audience to return to bed and “seed May”.

Out of context, the Cantamaggio may appear as simply charming and theatrical, but this ancient folk tradition reflects one of the primary threads which weaves itself through rural culture and tradition in Umbria: the rewards reaped for generosity and altruism and, on the flip side, the misfortune brought on by avarice and selfishness.

The songs of the “maggaiaoli” were once—and to a certain degree, continue to be—believed to have quasi-magical powers, invoking fertility charms on the fields and livestock depending upon how generous the serendaded families were in offering the musicians food and drink.  This reciprocity represents a theme which is one of the primary cornerstones of peasant life: giving in order to receive, from eating less wheat today in order to plant more seed tomorrow to helping out family members in the present in order to call on their aid in future times of need.

Keeping the beat with a "cempene" or tambourine

So before you return to your bed, it is good form to pass around wine to toast the musicians and the change of season. The “maggiaioli” are then sent off with fresh eggs and salame for their breakfast when the night’s festivities are completed and May has been, once again, “sung in”.

P.S. You can read about the Cantamaggio in Tuscany here.


Extreme sports in Umbria: Wild asparagus

Listen, to have any street cred at all, a hobby has to generate that frisson of excitement that only comes with the knowledge that you may end up either dead or seriously maimed. (Though, if you are a bumbling idiot like I am, pretty much any banal activity can end up, if not mortal, at the very least resulting in a trip to the emergency room. See, for example, soap making.) Luckily one of the most popular pastimes in the Umbrian countryside, despite its innocuous sound, involves enough flirting with danger to justify that certain John Wayne swagger.

Take a walk on the wild side. Wild asparagus, that is.

Around mid-march, when the winter rains have pretty much petered out and the first warm spring sun shows promise, you begin to see cars parked along the country roads as the Umbrians turn out en masse to hunt wild asparagus. “Hunt” may seem a little melodramatic to describe what amounts to tromping through the woods picking shoots, but once you’ve been you realize that these wily little woodland cousins to domestic asparagus are not that easy to spot.

See one here?

How ‘bout here, smartypants?

I told you. Over the years, I’ve become pretty good at rousting them out and after an hour in the woods am able to return home with my head held high and a trophy bundle. If you have the time and patience (and stake out your territory early in the day…during peak asparagus season the woods get pretty picked over by the end of the morning and you often see folks climbing back into their cars at lunchtime loading ten or more bundles of the prized wild vegetable in their trunks) you can end up picking enough in one day to put up for the rest of the year.

Note the gloves. Keep reading.

These thin stalks pack a lot of punch with their sharp flavour, so are better used as a condiment than a side dish. Try them with egg pasta like tagliatelle, in a frittata, or as a risotto. They can also be quickly blanched and frozen so you can enjoy them even when they’re no longer in season (which finishes around the end of May).

Asparagus hunter defying death and scraped knees.

But what about the mortal danger part? you may be wondering. As you’re foraging along in the woods through bushes and high grass, and stooping down to stick your hands under fallen leaves and the prickly aspargus plants to snap off your prize, you may run into this guy:

Yikes. Gives me the heebies even in .jpeg

Vipers, or adders, whose venom can be fatal (or, if it’s your lucky day, can just lead to kidney damage), are native to the area around Assisi, and when the sun starts to warm the hillsides they begin to come out of hibernation. Generally, it’s a good idea to wear boots and gloves when you are out hunting your asparagus, and you can also use walking sticks to flush out any unwanted reptile friends before sticking your hands in scrub. I haven’t yet had a brush with anything more startling than a lizard (There are hilarious Park Service signs on Mount Subasio with tips to help you identify a viper, including a description of the shape of its pupils. Like I’m going to hang out long enough to get a good gander at any snake’s pupils, viper or not.) and I hope I never do, as I would probably hang up my asparagus hunting hat forever.

Sure, I want to have some street cred, but I’d like to live long enough to eat it, too.


Ceci n’est pas un blog de cuisine: Strawberry Jam

Just to makes things clear at the outset, this is not a blog about food.  Or wine.  Or cooking in general.  It is, however, a blog about this wild toboggan ride commonly known as Life, and a big part of mine has to do with food, wine, and cooking in general.  So, there you have it. And now back to our regularly scheduled program.

Certain experiences are so overwhelmingly paradigm shifting that when you have them you feel like your very molecular structure has been altered somehow and you know instinctively and viscerally that you will never be the same again.  When you move overseas, for example.  When you become a parent.  When someone you love dies unexpectedly.  When you are bit by a radioactive spider and suddenly look buff in a skin-tight unitard. When, for the first time, you make jam.  Jam?!?  Yep.

Pick your berries

Saturday morning found me itching
To get on over to my grandma’s kitchen
The sweetest little berries was cooking up right
And then we’d put them in a canning jar and seal them up tight

I have learned lots of things since moving to a farm:

1. There’s a reason that there are no farmers amongst the annual Forbes 500.

2. Roosters do not crow at dawn, but all effing day (and night, if the mood should hit them.  The day I decide–after 20 years of vegetarianism–to eat meat once again, I will personally throttle a rooster with my bare hands and devour it with much vindictive satisfaction.)

3.  “A woman’s work is never done.” is one of the truest aphorisms ever uttered.

4.  If you want beef that isn’t chock full of antibiotics, hormones, and other stuff you wouldn’t want your dog to eat, you’re going to have to pay more than two bucks a pound.

5.  There is immense satisfaction to be had in growing good food, preserving good food, and serving good food.

Chop your berries

We have Smucker’s, Welches, Knotts Berry Farm
But a little homemade jam never did a body no harm
A little local motion is all we need
To close down these corporate jam factories

And that last little nugget of wisdom is all bound up in a jar of homemade jam, which has to be one of the easiest thing to make in the history of cooking by fire.  With just a little fruit, sugar, and—that most precious of ingredients—time, through some sort of mysterious culinary alchemy you end up with row upon row of jewel-toned glass jars shimmering on your pantry shelves.  Eating a slice of fresh hot bread slathered with sweet butter and homemade strawberry jam brings on such a feeling of life satisfaction that if, in that exact moment, an asteroid were to drop out of the sky and pick you off, you would feel no regret.

Cook your berries

Yeah, we have a little revolution sweeping the land
Now once more everybody’s making homemade jam
So won’t you call your friends up on the telephone
You invite ’em on over, you make some jam of your own

I find the act of making jam meditative…all the time I pick and wash fruit, peel, chop, and otherwise prepare it, sterilize the glass jars, and slowly stir the simmering mixture as it lets out its pectin and begins to thicken into jam, I reflect. I reflect on the abundance of what the earth offers. (When she damn well pleases.  The moody wench also likes to send late freezes, hail storms, and record rains. See item number 1 above.) I reflect on how often the most soul-satisfying food is the simplest.  I reflect on how many generations of women before me have “put up” food to feed their families, and how in this modern world of the information super highway and molecular gastronomy and Vibram Five Fingers this art remains largely unchanged.

Eat your berries

We’ll be making jam
Strawberry jam, mmmm-mm
If you want the best jam
You gotta make your own

And mostly I reflect on who will be eating this jam, this sparkling jar of distilled love.  My boys, whose favorite part of jam making is climbing the fig and apricot trees or going on blackberry picking expeditions along the tracks in the woods.  My friends, who know that due to a Aspberger-like social akwardness I often substitute gifts for hugs, but the sentiment is the same.  My guests, who have given me so much over the years in exchange for my modest offering of fruit, sugar, and time. And myself, who sometimes needs just a quiet moment with some simple strawberry sweetness to survive this wild toboggan ride of a life.

Eat your berries again, this time with feeling

Aw, one more time
Oh, makin’ that jam
Yeah, Strawberry jam
If you want the best jam
You gotta make your own

–Strawberry Jam song lyrics by Michelle Shocked


Strangers among us: the expat parent experience

It’s a sad day.

It’s a sad day, my friends, when your eight year old son fixes you with a look of impending doom and says, “Mamma, I have to tell you something.  But you’re not going to like it.”  And your eyes sweep over the china cabinet, which shows no signs of a soccer ball having been kicked through it, your nose sniffs the air, which does not reveal the acrid odor of legos being baked to see if they will stay stuck together, your hand touches the throat of his younger brother, in which a vital pulse is still beating.  So how bad can it be?

“Mamma, I don’t, um, really, you know, like peanut butter.”

And in that instant the universe shifts just a smidgen, the light seems to dim, your heartbeat slows in dismay, and what you have suspected for the past eight years is suddenly proven without a doubt.

Your children are not, and never will be, American.

I mean, I have had other clues of this over the years.  My sons were scandalized by their American cousins wearing un-ironed t-shirts on a recent trip to the States, they are convinced that eating cherries and drinking water in the same sitting will somehow land them in the hospital, and they have vowed they will never move out of my home (they are in for a big surprise come age 18).  They prefer prosciutto and bread to pancakes for breakfast, say that they are annoyed when bored or nervous when stressed out, and are constantly urging me to pass on the right.  However, until their rejection of the national childhood dish of the USA, I had harbored a hope that I could still, somehow, claim them as mine.

The one who doesn't like peanut butter.

There is a famous adage which says that parenting is essentially a process of slowly letting go of your child from the minute he is born, and this process is even more poignant when part of that letting go is not only of your  child but of your childhood.  Let’s face it, one of the best parts of parenting is reliving your own youth…the one you really had (I got my kids into Star Wars, early and hard) and the one you wish you had (I took them to Disneyland, where I always dreamed of going as a kid.).  But when they are growing up in a country and culture different from yours, it’s hard to engage them in your passions, your aspirations, your expectations.  You want them to fit in (and, coincidentally, not be ashamed of you—their foreign parent.  Their foreign parent who is still concerned with her cool quotient 39 years into the game.) but not go native.

The one who doesn't like wearing un-ironed t-shirts.

The irony here (because ain’t life ironical?) is that I lived the flip side of this same situation growing up in an immigrant Greek family in the 1970s.  I think now about how dismayed Yaya must have been to watch as subsequent generations gradually gave up the Orthodox faith, shunned the language, married non-Greeks, (“Honey,” she would say to me, “You find nice Greek boy to marry.  You make your Yaya happy, koukla.”) and finally ended up considering the gyros and yelling “Opa!” as the saganaki was set alight by a Mexican waiter the pinnacle of Greek culture.

The ones who claim they will never move away from home.

My children are not growing up Cub fans, don’t recognize the Good Humor ice cream truck, have never read the Sunday funny pages.  They will not have memories of fireworks on the 4th, of a day with cheese blintzes for breakfast/burritos for lunch/spanakopita for dinner, of trick-or-treating. My children are living a life infinitely different from the one I did and in some ways this makes them less mine.  My children are putting down roots and flourishing in a different land and I am, bit by bit, letting go of their future.

I am bit by bit, letting go of my past.

I am, bit by bit, letting go.


Falling off the wagon: Easter eggs, Italian style

I think there is a moment in life when you realize you have finally, after many close shaves, hit bottom.  When you have to have the courage to take a good, long look at yourself and admit that you have a problem.  That your habit is ruining your health, jeopardizing your family life, alienating your friends, and compromising your career.  That point when you suddenly realize that you, like Liz or Betty or that really emaciated model whose name escapes me right now, are an addict and it’s time to reclaim your life and self respect.

I am about to take the first step.  Hello, my name is Rebecca.  I ate all my children’s Easter candy.  Again.

L’uova di Pasqua

It’s not really about candy.  It’s about chocolate, since Easter candy here is almost exclusively huge chocolate Easter eggs, which are hollow and hide a surprise (usually a little toy or keychain) inside.  My sons got 22 of them this year (we have many, many relatives).  Each of them weighs about half a kilo.  That’s a lot of chocolate, and a pretty big temptation for an avowed chocoholic like yours truly.  It’s like holding a gamblers anon convention in Vegas.

The diabolic chocolate eggs

Every year I say to myself, “Okay, this is the year you are going to show some self control.  This year you are going to break up all those chocolate eggs into little pieces and freeze them for future baking.  And donate some of the chocolate to starving children in the Third World.  And throw a big dinner party and make a huge pot of chocolate fondue for dessert.”

Instead what happens is that those damn things sit there, in their shiny mylar wrapping, calling to me.  It wakes me up at night.  It interrupts my work.  It becomes an obsession.  So I say to myself, “Okay, one.  You can eat one egg.”  I make a tiny incision in the back side of one of the egg wrappings with a really sharp knife, and, with surgical precision, cut away a little piece.  It’s Venchi.  Milk chocolate.  It’s really good.  So I grab the egg, rip the paper to shreds, and proceed to stuff the rest of the egg by handfuls into my mouth, all the time keeping one eye on the door should my husband or children walk in on this spectacle.

Note the mesmerizing mylar decorative paper

Luckily, my kids are still kind of fuzzy about numbers above ten, so they don’t really notice that their eggs are slowly culled as the days pass.  Plus, I give them the toys, which is all they really care about anyway.

Unfortunately, my husband is not that fuzzy about numbers above ten, and is horrified to discover that his wife has managed to put away about 10 kilos of chocolate in less than a week.  I really think it is one of the few times in the almost 20 years I have known him that I have felt real shame.  That and the three times I crashed the car.

Why, why can’t they eat the disgustingly unappetizing Easter candy we have in the States here?  I mean, if my choices were yellow sugar covered marshmallow chicks and black jelly beans, there wouldn’t be much of a problem.  I have a vague recollection of liking those things when I was, oh, five, but the very thought of eating them now makes my stomach turn.  It’s funny how we grow out of food.  I also used to love that peanut butter and jelly together in one jar stuff and Oreos.  Thank God my taste buds have matured, though my self control has remained what it was in kindergarten.

Even more of a temptation when not encased in mylar

We also have a momentous amount of chocolate in the house around Easter because we throw an annual Easter egg hunt.  We began when my oldest son was born (I think he was barely walking the first year we held the hunt), and every year the party gets bigger and better.  I love the Easter party, though we rarely have decent weather.  Usually, about 100 people huddle under our porch watching a driving, freezing rain come down and wait for a ten minute window in which the kids can book into the garden and collect the sodden eggs.

After years of trial and error, and running over months old rotten eggs with the lawn mower, we have, for the past couple of years, only hidden plastic eggs (which still get run over with the mower in August, but just make a terrifying noise without the sickening stench).  We hide a couple hundred of them, and inside each one is a little chocolate egg that the finder gets to keep and take home.  I buy those little chocolate eggs in bulk, and strangely seem to overbuy every year.  It’s uncanny.  Call it fate.

My boys with their Easter baskets ready to take to Mass for the traditional blessing; their chocolate eggs are in the center

Of course, that’s far too much sugar for my babes, so the sacrifice I make for them is to consume them all myself.  Sometimes, as a parent, you have to take the bullet for your kids.

The Easter egg hunt is a very popular party with our set because of the novelty.  They don’t do egg hunts in Italy; it’s very much an Anglo-American tradition, as far as I can tell.  Since my elder son was born, I have been really working hard to bring a little bit of American Childhood to Italy.  We have the Halloween party, Thanksgiving Dinner, the Christmas Cookie Decorating get together, the Easter Egg hunt.  We haven’t had a Fourth of July shindig yet, but I think it’s just a matter of time.

Only Italians would use a bottle of wine for scale

I find it strange, and a bit out of character, that I put so much weight on these American holidays.  There are lots of different expat profiles here in Italy, which run a vast gamut of different living abroad experiences.  There are those who live in a kind of Anglo-American bubble:  they don’t speak Italian, may not even send their kids to Italian schools, don’t socialize with Italians, and are very shaky on Italian law, politics, and pop culture.  I suspect they live here primarily for the food.  Some in this group, mostly those who have found themselves residents here through marriage or career, also live in a state of suspended animation, passing most of their time and funnelling most of their resources, to those periods that they go “back home”.  Home being that place they left, oh, twenty years ago.

Then there are those on the complete opposite end of the spectrum, who have glommed onto Italy with all the passion of the newly converted.  They refuse to speak their mother tongue, even when introduced to fellow English speakers, have nothing good to say about their home country, which they visit once every ten years during which visit they annoy all their friends and relatives touting non-stop the joys of living in Italy, have nothing bad to say about Italy, even when the utility bill comes, and wouldn’t eat at McDonald’s even if you held a loaded pistol to their temple.

After a brief stint as a passionate newly converted (until my first utility bill came, which set me in a pining-for-home rut for awhile), I have settled at a place pretty much right smack in the middle.  I love the country I live in now, but also have some nostalgia for the one I left years ago.  When I am in the States I tend to make pasta and change into clean clothes to run to the grocery store.  When I am in Italy, I prepare pancakes for breakfast and drop my kids off at school in sweatpants.  I have one foot here, and one there.  And both my hands in the chocolate eggs.

Venchi milk chocolate Easter eggs. Say that, and you've said it all.


Food for the soul…Torta di Pasqua

I have a little confession to make.  Each year, right around Easter, I am reminded of this deep love I harbor which surfaces in a cyclical fashion with the coming of spring.  I mean, not your normal “Oh, I love that sweater on her” or “I just love to curl up on the sofa in front of a roaring fire” kind of love, but that obsessive, slightly creepy “I want to start a life with you and buy you presents” kind of love.

Which is weird, since the object of my ardor is a foodstuff.

Though, to be honest, I’ve noticed that my passion for food is growing more acute as I have become a middle-aged mother of two and things like heavy drinking, recreational drug use, and sleeping around no longer seem appropriate.  Let’s just say that eating is one of the few joys of life left to me.

Torta di Pasqua

And Easter in Umbria offers humanity a dish which represents, in my opinion, the apex of culinary accomplishment.  Its ne plus ultra.  Its climax. (Ok, now I am getting creepy.)  My friends, I present to you Torta di Pasqua (also known as Pizza di Pasqua or simply Torta al Formaggio).

Literally seconds from the oven....

The recipe

This savory cheese bread is a traditional Easter dish around these parts and the recipe varies from family to family and is a closely guarded secret handed down through the generations.  However, from what I can glean from years of attentive observation, there are a few key ingredients used in all its variants:

  1. a farmwife, between the ages of 62 and 87
  2. an amazing amount of lard
  3. an outdoor wood-burning brick oven
  4. an astounding amount of lard
  5. eggs, and a lot of ’em
  6. an astonishing amount of lard
  7. parmeggiano, pecorino, and swiss cheese
  8. an insane amount of lard
  9. some other stuff, mainly flour and salt

The Preparation

The preparation of this dish begins weeks before baking day, as the farmwives start to hoard their eggs (News flash:  farm fresh eggs keep forever, and they don’t have to go in the fridge.  Things you discover when you move to the country.) as they will be using literally dozens to turn out the numerous mushroom-shaped loaves.  I suppose you could even say the preparation begins months before, when they butcher their annual hog at Christmas and put aside the lard (Did I mention the awesome amount of lard? For an explanation as to my non-dogmatic interpretation of vegetarianism which allows for the occasional lard intake, see here.) they will later need for the dough.

Kneading the dough

Preparing the pans for the oven

Surveying the oven-ready loaves (note the dollops of lard dotting each one...did I mention the lard?)

The big day

Early on the morning of baking day, the women light the fires in their woodstoves and knead together all the ingredients to make the rich, cheesy bread dough.  This is then divided into at least a dozen different tins (many of them refitted industrial sized sardine cans) and left to rest and rise near the warmth of the oven.

Getting the wood stove up to temperature

Sardine can reincarnated as baking tin

Before the flames

Once nicely double or tripled in size and rounded on the top, they are placed into the oven one by one with a large wooden paddle, an olive branch blessed during Mass on Palm Sunday is tucked in with them, a quick prayer to Santa Rita is said (the gist:  “Santa Rita, please let our loaves rise””), and the oven door is sealed with mud.

A surprising number of baking tins fit in that oven

After the flames

When they are done, they should have risen over the sides of their tins to take the shape of giant cupcakes and are shiny and golden on top.  As you can see, sometimes Santa Rita is a cunning vixen and they don’t rise as much as the bakers would like…leading to the naming of the saint in much different–and probably unprintable–terms.

Despite olive branches and appeals to heaven, the loaves didn't rise as much as hoped

The elixir of the gods

To slice into one of these torte fresh from the oven is to experience bliss. The lard (did I mention the incredible amount of lard?) yields a short, crumbly crust on the outside and a moist, savory crumb inside dotted with melted cubes of swiss cheese.  Some recipes use a bit of pepper in the dough, which I enjoy, though it’s tough to get just the right amount without overshadowing the cheese flavor.  Our aunt, Zia Anna, gets just the right amount, for example.  And I love her for it.

Crispy outside, moist inside

It’s otherwordly freshly baked, but can also be frozed and toasted for weeks afterwards…still delicious, though will not bring you to ecstatic tears, which a steaming hot slice certainly can do.

Cast and crew: from left Zia Anna, Nicolò, Nonna Emma, Zia Viola